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After School Enrichment Classes begin Monday, January 13!

  • 1/7/14
  • Posted by: (nicole)

Didn’t register yet? The following classes still have space available:

Martial Arts (3 spots left)

Kindergarten Art/Printmaking II (7 spots left)

Yoga/Movement 3 & 4’s –Tuesdays (4 spots left)

Art/Painting 4 & 5’s –Non K’s (3 spots left)

Spanish 3pm (2 spots left)

Spanish 4pm (open)


Well-known Montessori Students

  • 1/7/14
  • Posted by: (nicole)

"What do P. Diddy, Sergey Brin, and Peter Drucker have in common? When it comes to producing creative business leaders, a Montessori education has proven to be a potent predictor of future success." ~ Glenn Rifkin, Briefings Magazine

Korn/Ferry is an international executive placement firm that works with leading corporations and business leaders world-wide. Last year they published the following article in the Winter, 2013 issue of their magazine, Briefings. The author, Glenn Rifkin, explores the strong link between a Montessori education and innovative and creative business leadership. Read the article.

Well-known Montessori Students:

Sergey Brin and Larry Page, Montessori classmates and co-founders of Google.

Anne Frank, Montessori student through 7th grade and author

Jeffrey Bezos, Founder of Amazon.com

Katharine Graham, Former Owner/Editor of the Washington Post   "The Montessori method—learning by doing— once again became my stock in trade..." from Personal History by Katharine Graham

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Noble prize winning author

Peter Drucker, Management Guru

Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, Editor, Former First Lady

Sean 'P. Diddy' (formerly known as Puffy) Combs, RAP mega-star

Prince William and Prince Harry, English royal family

T. Berry Brazelton, Pediatrician and Author

Melissa and Sarah Gilbert, Actors

Chelsea Clinton, special correspondent NBC news among other things

George Clooney, Actor

Cami Cotler, Actor

John and Joan Cusack, Actors

Dakota Fanning, Actor

Helen Hunt, Actor

Lea Salonga, Actor

Julia Child, Chef, Star of TV Cooking Shows, and Author

Friedensreich Hundertwasser, Austrian painter and Architect

Mark Zuckerberg, Creator and Founder of Facebook

Many well-known people chose Montessori for their own children including the following:

Stephen J. Cannell, Writer-Producer-Director

Patty Duke Astin, Actor

Andrew Lloyd Webber, Musical Theater Composer

Hugh Grant, Actor

Cher Bono, Singer and Actress

John Bradshaw, Psychologist and Author

Yul Brynner, Actor

Shari Lewis, Actor

Susan St. James, Actor

Marcy Carcy, TV producer

Bill and Hillary Clinton, Former President and Former NY Senator and Secretary of State

Michael Douglas, Actor

Shari Lewis, Puppeteer and children’s television pioneer

Yo Yo Ma, Cellist

Willie Nelson, Singer-songwriter, author, poet, actor, and activist.

Jennifer Granholm, 47th Governor of Michigan, educator, author, and political commentator

Other accomplished people connected to Montessori include:                                                                         
Alexander Graham Bell (inventor) and his wife Mabel founded the Montessori Education Association in 1913.  They also provided financial support directly to Dr. Maria Montessori and helped establish the first Montessori class in Canada and one of the first in the United States.

Fred “Mister” Rogers, children's TV personality, was a strong supporter of Montessori education.

Thomas Edison, scientist and inventor, helped found a Montessori school

Margaret Wilson, President Woodrow Wilson's daughter, trained as a Montessori teacher and was secretary of the first American Montessori Association. There was a Montessori classroom in the Wilson White House.

Alice Waters, Montessori Teacher, Author, founder of world-renowned Chez Panisse in Berkeley, CA; founder of the Edible School Yard, based on Montessori philosophy of learning through experience.

Jean Piaget, noted Swiss psychologist, made his first observations of children in a Montessori school. He was also head of the Swiss Montessori Society for many years.

To learn more about Maria Montessori, her life and work, you may borrow any of the numerous books in Greene Towne’s library or visit this web site:  http://www.montessori-namta.org/Maria-Montessori


The New Year brings lots of new babies to the Greene Towne Montessori School Community!

  • 1/7/14
  • Posted by: (nicole)

Congratulations to all the Greene Towne families that welcomed a new baby in 2013.

“The greatness of the human personality begins at the hour of birth…The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind.”  Maria Montessori

Read more about Infant development at: http://www.michaelolaf.net/1JC1stLLL.html


Happy Birthday Montessori Education!

  • 1/7/14
  • Posted by: (nicole)

This month marks the 107th anniversary of the first Montessori 3 to 6-year-old classroom.  Maria Montessori opened her first Casa dei Bambini, Children’s House, in Rome on January 6, 1907; she reflects on those early days in her landmark book, The Absorbent Mind.

“Ours was a house for children rather than a real school.  We had prepared a place for children where a diffused culture could be assimilated from the environment, without any need for direct instruction…Yet these children learned to read and write before they were five, and no one had given them any lessons.  At that time it seemed miraculous that children of four and a half should be able to write, and that they should have learned without the feeling of having been taught.

We puzzled over it for a long time.  Only after repeated experiments did we conclude with certainty that all children are endowed with this capacity to absorb culture.  If this be true – we then argued – if culture can be acquired without effort, let us provide children with other elements of culture.  And then we saw they ‘absorb’ far more than reading and writing: botany, zoology, mathematics, geography, and all with the same ease, spontaneously and without getting tired.

And so we discovered that education is not something that the teacher does, but that it is a natural process which develops spontaneously in the human being.  It is not acquired by listening to words, but by virtue of experiences in which the child acts on his environment.  The teacher’s task is not to talk, but to prepare and arrange a series of motives for cultural activity in a special environment made for the child.

My experiments, conducted in many different countries, have now been going on for forty years (ed. Now over 100 years) and as the children grew up parents kept asking me to extend my methods to the later ages.  We then found that individual activity is the one factor that stimulates and produces development, and that this is not more true for the little ones of preschool age than it is for the junior, middle, and upper school children.”   

Maria Montessori reflecting on her first school in The Absorbent Mind


HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM THE ACTING HEAD OF SCHOOL Maria Kaminstein

  • 12/20/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, New Year – what a month of festivities!  I hope that you and your families are having special times together, and that the children’s awe at lighted candles, joy in extra treats, and excitement over travel are lifting your hearts.  As a mother and grandmother, I’m aware that this is also a season of meltdowns, irrational exuberance, and mysterious illnesses.  Even so,  may you glimpse the freshness and joy of childhood in the midst of busy-ness.

It has been a pleasure for me to be a part of the Greene Towne community during this past month-and-a-half.  The staff are carrying on with dedication and professionalism, parents have been welcoming, and the children, of course, are the best part of all.

I’ve been speaking with Helena, she too wishes the entire GTMS community happy holidays.


SAVE THE DATE - MLK Day Service Project at GTMS

  • 12/20/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

On Monday, January 20, GTMS will host a morning of service for students and their families.  We will make blankets to donate to Project Linus,  a non-profit organization that provides homemade blankets to children in need (http://www.projectlinus.org/).  Primary children (and older siblings) with parents' assistance will make fleece tie blankets, while toddler children (and younger siblings) will decorate cards to go with each blanket as they are packaged in gift bags for delivery.  Tickets will be sold in advance ($5 per person or $20 per family to cover the cost of materials) when you sign up for one hour time slots to participate.  Refreshments provided!

 
There are several ways you can get involved:
- Volunteer to help with the event itself (organization ahead of time and on day of the event):  please email Julie Collins at  if interested
- Plan to attend the event with your family:  mark your calendar now and look for sign up information to come after the New Year.

Make-Up Date for Primary Parent-Child Visit

  • 12/12/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

We were so sorry that Tuesday’s snow meant that we had to postpone the Primary parent-child visit for the second year, third year and Kindergarten children.  But we have a make-up date!  The visit will take place on Tuesday, January 14, 2014, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m.  Put it on your calendars, and we’ll see you then.


Snow Days at Greene Towne

  • 12/12/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

In the past GTMS has typically followed the public school closing decision when there is inclement weather.  However, on a couple of occasions public schools closed in anticipation of a weather event that never happened, so Greene Towne now makes independent decisions re: closing (see pp. 15-16 in the Parent Handbook).  The public school decision is taken into account, but Greene Towne can sometimes remain open when other schools do not.

A couple of factors that make our situation different from that of the public system: 1) We don’t have to consider bussing and 2) Center City is often more passable – by vehicle or on foot – than surrounding areas.  The majority of our families can make it in to the school even through a couple of inches of snow.

We’ll always put the closing/opening status on our web site, post our school closing number on KYW, and send you an email when school is closed – and in the future, to prevent confusion, we will do the same when we remain open during a public school closing.


A note from Helena

  • 12/11/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

I want to wish everyone happy holidays and to thank you for the outpouring of support. Your cards, flowers, texts, gifts, well wishes and prayers have helped me on my road to recovery. I think of you each day and feel so fortunate to stand among you as part of the GTMS Community.

Best regards,
Helena


101 Things Parents Can Do to Help Children

  • 12/11/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

101 Things Parents Can Do to Help Children continues this week with

41 through 50!  We hope these little hints are helpful in your parenting adventures!


41. Whenever you go somewhere with your child, prepare him/her for what is going to happen and what will be expected of him/her at the store, restaurant, doctor's office, etc.

42. Express appreciation to your child and others and help your child to do the same. Send thank you notes for gifts. Young children can dictate or send a picture. Older children can write their own. Key is learning the importance of expressing appreciation.

43. Help your child to learn to like healthful foods. Never force a child to eat something he/she does not like, but also don't offer unlimited alternatives! Make trying new things fun. Talk about foods and how they look or describe the taste. Introduce the word "savor" and teach how to do it. Engage children in food preparation.

44. When food shopping, talk to your child about what you see -- from kumquats to lobsters. Talk about where food items come from. Talk about the people who help us by growing, picking, transporting, and displaying food.

45. Provide your child with appropriate sized furniture: his/her own table and chair to work at; perhaps a rocker in the living room to be with you; a bed that can easily be made by a child; a stool for climbing up to sink or counter.
 

46. While driving, point things out and discuss -- construction work, interesting buildings, vehicles, bridges, animals.

47. Teach the language of courtesy. Don't interrupt your child and don’t let your child interrupt. Teach how to wait after saying, "Excuse me, please."

48. Analyze any annoying behavior of your child and teach from the positive. For example: door slamming -- show how to close a door; running in the house -- show how to walk; runny nose -- demonstrate how to use a tissue.

49. Spend quality time with people of different ages.

50. Teach your child about your faith and make them feel a part of it.

Stay tuned, in the New Year we’ll continue “101 Things Parents Can Do to Help Children.”


GIFTS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

  • 12/11/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

As you wrap up your holiday gift selection keep in mind that simple gifts often appeal to young children as much as, or even more than, the big flashy commercial ones.  A child’s favorite activities can suggest some unusual but very appropriate gifts. These gifts can be imaginative, investigative, and constructive. They are as likely to come from the hardware store or the fabric store as from the toy store. They might be “put together” as well as purchased and they might not be things at all. Experiences and shared memories offer so much more value than flashy toys  Here are some suggestions for great gifts for children of all ages that engage them in the world around them and help them create lifelong memories:

a membership to a museum

tickets to a special play or concert

a flashlight, a magnifying glass, potter’s clay

pastels or watercolors and a pad of paper

small gardening tools and seeds

small bread pans and a children’s baking recipe book

yarn and a crochet hook, colored scarves for dress-up

boxes for organizing a child’s collections

(rocks, seed pods, cars, this list is endless)

a photo album and a simple camera

an amaryllis bulb and a book in which to draw pictures as it grows

and, most important, time with you!

Your child learns and experiences the world best through her/his hands. Avoid electronic toys and give your child the gift of hands-on discovery by choosing gifts that speak to all their senses. Your knowledge of your child’s special interests will guide you – with these simple gifts you and your child will have many opportunities to create meaningful holiday memories!  


After School Enrichment-Winter Session Sign up

  • 12/5/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

Sign up for After School Enrichment!

Copies will be at the front desk, or you can download here.


Pajama Day Rewind!

  • 12/5/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)
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Thanksgiving Food Drive Rewind

  • 12/5/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)
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Thank you to all of you, our Greene Towne families, for the generous contributions to this year’s Thanksgiving Food Drive, benefitting SHARE. During Kindergarten time a few weeks ago, all the Kindergarten children gathered to hear about the challenges faced by families who don’t have enough food. The Monday before Thanksgiving, our oldest students sorted all the generous donations into categories: Vegetables, Fruit, Meat, Pasta, Cereal, Beans, etc. putting to good use their emerging reading skills.

After sorting the donations we talked about how much this food is needed in our community to help people who don’t have enough food to eat and how grateful the recipients are for the donations.

We are grateful to all the parents who helped organize the drive and who came in to support the Kindergarteners during the sorting.

We also talked about things for which we are thankful. Here are some of the things our Kindergarten students said:

I’m thankful for:

my cat

my blanket

my family

such a big house

for a 165-year-old house

for my brothers and cousins

for my baby brother

for trees

for getting together with family

for everything except for beestings

for food

for food trees and apple pie

for getting together with my cousins

for my baby sister

for friends

for family and friends

that my mommy came today.


This week we resume: 101 Things Parents Can Do to Help Children

  • 12/5/13
  • Posted by: (nicole)

Parenting tips and kick off with these wise words from James A. Baldwin, American novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic.


“Children have never been very good at listening to their elders,

but they have never failed to imitate them.” J.A.B


 Here are 31 through 40!  We hope you will take a few moments to read them

and consider which of these can fit into your life.


31. Tell and re-tell family based stories. For example, "On the day you were born..."

32. Look at family pictures together. Help your child be aware of his/her extended family, names, and relationships.

33. Construct your child's biography, the story of his/her life. A notebook is ideal so that it can be added to each year. Sharing one's story can become a much loved ritual. It can be shared with the child's class at birthday time.

34. Assist your child to be aware of his/her feelings, to have vocabulary for emotions and be able to express them.

35. Play games together. Through much repetition children learn to take turns, to win and lose.


36. Together, do things to help others. For example, take food to an invalid neighbor, contribute blankets to a homeless shelter, give toys to those who have none, etc.

37. Speak the language of the virtues. Talk about patience, cooperativeness, courage, ingenuity, cheerfulness, helpfulness, kindness, etc. and point out those virtues when you see them demonstrated.


38. Refrain from giving your child too much "stuff." If there is already too much, give some away or store and rotate.

39. Memorize poetry and teach it to your child and recite it together.

40. Put up a bird feeder. Let your child have responsibility for filling it. Together learn to be good watchers and learn about the birds you see.